UN Hardship Classification

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mdr
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UN Hardship Classification

Post by mdr » 30 Oct 2018, 16:16

I've read the primary document from ICSC (https://icsc.un.org/resources/hrpd/mah/MOBILITYENG.pdf) but I was wondering if anyone has a much clearer picture on what each of the classification entails (except for A of course). I'll be going to a place with hardship Grade B so I want to have a better idea on what I should expect. I have a friend who was posted to Afghanistan and that was Grade E for both hardship and danger pay- never goes out to his Duty Station without his helmet and vest plus he was entitled to mandatory long-leave.

H.O.P
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Re: UN Hardship Classification

Post by H.O.P » 30 Oct 2018, 16:24

I am equally going to an E classified station. E stations are the worst of them all. I have been told it's austere, practically no life there except within camp and nothing else really is available there. I have been mentally readying myself to face it and actually kind of looking forward to it. I will be documenting each and every moment of my life/experience there. It is a story/experience I will like to tell in detail in the future.

mdr
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Re: UN Hardship Classification

Post by mdr » 01 Nov 2018, 13:31

Wow! Good luck! Intense, exciting and rewarding! I can only imagine the stories you will tell.

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Re: UN Hardship Classification

Post by ichtus » 11 Nov 2018, 20:57

mdr wrote:
30 Oct 2018, 16:16
I've read the primary document from ICSC (https://icsc.un.org/resources/hrpd/mah/MOBILITYENG.pdf) but I was wondering if anyone has a much clearer picture on what each of the classification entails (except for A of course). I'll be going to a place with hardship Grade B so I want to have a better idea on what I should expect. I have a friend who was posted to Afghanistan and that was Grade E for both hardship and danger pay- never goes out to his Duty Station without his helmet and vest plus he was entitled to mandatory long-leave.
Don't worry. Grade B is pretty much livable, with educational, medical and living facilities, etc. You will most likely be able to find big supermarkets with imported products (if it's a big city) and you'll be able to rent a decent place with infrastructure.

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Re: UN Hardship Classification

Post by mdr » 12 Nov 2018, 17:14

ichtus wrote:
11 Nov 2018, 20:57

Don't worry. Grade B is pretty much livable, with educational, medical and living facilities, etc. You will most likely be able to find big supermarkets with imported products (if it's a big city) and you'll be able to rent a decent place with infrastructure.
Thanks, ichtus! I know the place I'm going to has those things and more but I forgot to mention that I wanted an idea on the 'bad'. Haha. From what I read of the place, it is indeed quite livable and stable. Not too bad at all and I'm genuinely looking forward (on top of getting my dream job and all). But I also read there's malaria and dengue and possibly issues with guns (I saw a CCTV footage of an armed robbery taken at a place just outside the capital of where I'll be based) so I'm guessing those are the 'bad' of what level B entails..

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Re: UN Hardship Classification

Post by mdr » 12 Nov 2018, 17:15

Also, if anyone has an idea of the other levels, that'd be great and insightful too!

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Re: UN Hardship Classification

Post by ichtus » 12 Nov 2018, 21:54

mdr wrote:
12 Nov 2018, 17:14
ichtus wrote:
11 Nov 2018, 20:57

Don't worry. Grade B is pretty much livable, with educational, medical and living facilities, etc. You will most likely be able to find big supermarkets with imported products (if it's a big city) and you'll be able to rent a decent place with infrastructure.
Thanks, ichtus! I know the place I'm going to has those things and more but I forgot to mention that I wanted an idea on the 'bad'. Haha. From what I read of the place, it is indeed quite livable and stable. Not too bad at all and I'm genuinely looking forward (on top of getting my dream job and all). But I also read there's malaria and dengue and possibly issues with guns (I saw a CCTV footage of an armed robbery taken at a place just outside the capital of where I'll be based) so I'm guessing those are the 'bad' of what level B entails..
You're welcome. The consideration for hardship classification has a number of parameters, one of which is the security level. What you described above sounds 'normal' for developing countries (but think about it, even Paris nowadays has gun shots on the street). What I mean is, don't get over worried. For security issue, one piece of advice is to always follow UNDSS advice and let somebody know where you are in case of trouble.

Generally speaking, the living condition deteriorates from Grade B to E. Grade E is typically for non-family duty stations.

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Sebastian
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Re: UN Hardship Classification

Post by Sebastian » 18 Nov 2018, 07:41

ichtus wrote:
12 Nov 2018, 21:54
The consideration for hardship classification has a number of parameters, one of which is the security level. What you described above sounds 'normal' for developing countries (but think about it, even Paris nowadays has gun shots on the street). What I mean is, don't get over worried. For security issue, one piece of advice is to always follow UNDSS advice and let somebody know where you are in case of trouble.

Generally speaking, the living condition deteriorates from Grade B to E. Grade E is typically for non-family duty stations.
Indeed, many different aspects are factored into the classification. As @ichtus says - follow DSS advice and you should be fine. The complaint I hear more from UN personnel is that DSS is not "allowing" things that locals would consider "safe" rather than the other way round. While street crime etc. can hit you anywhere/anytime, I'm personally never concerned about security / safety since I follow DSS guidelines & rules.
I'm Sebastian from the UN Job List. I know about the UN Job List and also a little about the UN in general.

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